Caring for a Person with Dementia

I am convinced God exists in the eternal Now, and that their time with (their mother) becomes holy, no matter how difficult.

Almost all the seniors we serve are facing a significant loss of independence, and now depend on others for various aspects of their daily lives. Sometimes this is due to chronic illness, or physical or mental disability, and for some it is simply a matter of safety. For all of them, giving up independence is challenging. Most of the people we serve had vibrant, productive lives, raised families, and set and achieved significant goals. Now, often the simplest things are difficult. We are privileged to journey with our wonderful seniors as they learn to live into their new normal, offering them grace, kindness, and love. One of the most challenging aspects is caring for those with some form of dementia. I have become acquainted with two brothers whose mother does not remember them. Yet, they visit her faithfully. Why, when she does not remember? They have come to understand that all any of us has is the now. There is no guarantee that any of us will live one more moment. All we have is the now, and their mother lives in that perpetual now. She never worries about the future. They strive to join her in that now. I am convinced God exists in the eternal Now, and that their time with her becomes holy, no matter how difficult. Caring for those with dementia reveals much about who we are, and what we really believe.